Monthly Archives: September, 2013

HFACH: Reading Aloud and Creating Community

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In Honey for a Child’s Heart, Hunt states, “The teachers I remember best are those who read to us each day from some wonderful book” (23).  I think most of us can relate.  Hearing a story read aloud can create powerful memories.  But are there other, larger-scale benefits to reading aloud to a child or group of children?

This semester in my graduate school program I am exploring topics for my graduate thesis paper: a task that (only two weeks into class) is already making my head spin.  This week we learned about various epistemological dimensions of learning, including the social dimension.  Within this dimension, teachers are particularly concerned with a student’s self-awareness and how self-actualization can be utilized within a community context.  As one article put it, it’s learning to think as “we” as well as “I” (Prakash & Waks, 88).

I know that reading aloud to children is a powerful experience.  As Hunt states in HFACH, reading aloud within the presence of great writing creates a closeness: “…we felt bound together by the experience” (23).  Is it the sense of embarking on an unknown adventure with others that creates this binding of individuals?  In terms of the impacts of reading aloud, couldn’t one be that reading aloud has the power to create a sense of community among listeners?

But this also made me think about reading aloud in a broader community context.  I see advertisements for special reading times at bookstores, libraries and even some churches.  Could there be a correlation between children who are read to within a community setting and the children’s sense of belonging within that particular community?  If so, that takes the powerful experience Hunt describes to a completely new level.

As I consider these questions, I’m not sure if I will take them on in my paper, but I am curious to get some opinions.  How has reading aloud impacted you/your child(ren)/your student(s)?  Have you felt connected to others through a group reading experience?

Perhaps reading aloud can not just bind together students in classrooms, but individuals in entire communities.

Free Sign Language Resources

My friend Jeff over at www.livingbilingual.com has compiled a great list of FREE internet resources to learn sign language.

"A-S-L" signed with American Sign La...

“A-S-L” signed with American Sign Language, combined Image: (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Whether you are interested in teaching your little one baby sign language OR learning ASL (American Sign Language) as a second (or third, or fourth) language for yourself, this is a great place to start.

Click here to access the info!  

You can also read about Kristi’s experience with baby sign language by reading her guest post here.

Happy Reading (and Signing!)

Lindsay