Tag Archives: Book talk

Enthusiasm in the Tell Me Framework: Likes and Dislikes

This is the second post covering the Tell Me Framework.  Click here to be directed to the introductory post.

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Have you ever noticed what usually happens when someone asks you about a book you’ve just read?  I know that I usually answer by offering one of three responses:

1.       “It’s about ______________( fill in the blank).

2.       “It was really good.”

3.       “It was really bad.”

Chances are, when someone asks you about a book, you think in terms of the overall story: you either liked it or you didn’t like it.  If someone asks you for more detail, you give them an overview of the plot.  Simple, right?   Well, Aidan Chambers states that these blanket responses about literature actually drive children to give simple answers when discussing books.   In Tell Me: Children, Reading and Talk, Chambers points out the notion that children generally hear adults talking about books in terms of the general story, not about the significance of the story.  Instead of focusing on a reader’s enthusiasm brought about by a piece of literature, much book-talk is minimized to merely a discussion about the plot.  But (as we know from high school literature classes), books offer so much more than that!  But why don’t we talk about the other elements books have to offer us as unique human beings?  Dare I say that perhaps this is why children don’t want to talk much about books either?

Luckily, the Tell Me framework is all about encouraging enriching and meaningful discussions about books for children and adults with methods that are quite simple, yet very revealing and effective.  For example, Chambers points out two types of EXTREMELY HUMBLE enthusiasms that children can share when discussing books: likes and dislikes.

When an adult asks a child about his specific likes and dislikes concerning a book, it is not a request for a regurgitation of the plot.  Instead, the adult is asking the child to engage in a discussion about their personal fervor for elements of the story that surprised, pleased or displeased them.  While the request is simple, the internal engagement a child must undergo provokes complex and detailed responses about their individual reactions and how their enthusiasms apply to their own lives.

In Honey for a Child’s Heart, Gladys Hunt states the power books have in allowing families to communicate: “Knowing someone means sharing ideas, growing together.  It means not being embarrassed about feelings or being yourself” (76).  I think that Chambers’ framework for sparking conversations about books feeds into this notion of communication.  When an adult asks a child to share his likes and dislikes about a particular book, additional conversation topics will come to the surface that won’t just reveal more about the book, but about the child himself.  This is of great benefit to parents and teachers when trying to encourage thoughtful responses in class or around the dinner table.

I challenge you to ban the question, “Did you like it?” when asking a child about a book he’s just read.  Instead, request that the child TELL YOU about what he liked.  Then, about what he didn’t like.  If more thoughtful engagement ensues (or even if it doesn’t) please comment below!

Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell? Not in Children’s Literature! (An Overview of the TELL ME Framework)

Teachers and parents strive everyday to prompt conversations among children about books.  Sometimes starting these conversations can be like pulling teeth.  Aidan Chambers realized this and sought to create a framework for adults to engage children in reading thoughtfully and responding articulately to the books they’ve read.  In his book, Tell Me: Children, Reading, and Talk, Chambers outlines steps for adults to take in sparking conversations that make children excited, not just about reading, but about talking about reading.

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Chambers places equal value on reading books and talking about books.  He states:

“Talking well about books is a high-value activity in itself.  But talking well about books is also the best rehearsal there is for talking well about other things.  So in helping children to talk about their reading, we help them to be articulate about the rest of their lives” (2).

I love that Chambers sees the act of reading in this constructive manner.  Reading not only has intrinsic value in itself, but the activity can be used as a tool to enhance individualism and overall personal development.  But, in order for books to have this transformative impact, the adults in a child’s life must place value on reading and engaging children in a dialogue about literature.  Chambers is clear that children cannot become avid readers if they are not within an environment that supports and encourages this activity.  Adults need to be available to help a child make sense of the marks on each page of a chosen book.  There is a direct correlation between the richness of a child’s reading environment and the richness of the talk surrounding the books they have read.

But how do adults create such a positive environment?  It starts with two words: TELL ME.  Adults can prompt meaningful conversations simply by uttering these unassuming words.  Chambers advocates that adults ask children to tell them about the following aspects of a book:

  • Tell me what you liked
  • Tell me what you didn’t like
  • Tell me what puzzled you
  • Tell me about patterns you noticed

These simple requests will do so much more than asking a child the most common question: Why?   The  Why? question can often be too big for a child to process.  Chambers states that Why? can overwhelm a child because he assumes that the adult already knows the answer and is expecting something specific.  Contrastingly, Tell me… frees a child from assumed expectations and allows him to generously articulate true responses.

Try using this approach while reading to your children, and see if more thoughtful and excited responses emerge in your book-talk.  More posts on the specifics of the “Tell Me” approach will be coming soon!

Happy Reading!

Lindsay