Tag Archives: Eric Carle

Recent Favorites

Stella-Bucca is now 18 months old and has developed some definite favorites in terms of books, even desiring to “read” some to me as she flips through the pages and recites the lines she remembers from our reading experiences.  Here’s a quick rundown of some of Bucca’s recent favorites.  I’ve found that all of these have really captured her attention and delighted her to the point of desired multiple readings in one sitting.  All except Carle’s book feature a set rhythm that provides a sense of order in the text, which may be a contributing factor in my Bucca’s interest…she LOVES music and dancing, and many of these books can be sung as they’re read.

Our list includes:

We’re Going on a Bear Hunt by Helen Oxenbury and Michael Rosen

bear hunt

Hand, Hand, Fingers, Thumb by Al Perkins

hand hand

Moo, Baa, La La La by Sandra Boynton

moo baa

The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle

caterpillar

The Pout Pout Fish by Deborah Diesen

pout pout

Be sure to check them out!

Lindsay (and Bucca)

Post Master’s Paper Observations


I haven’t posted in quite some time because I’ve been focusing on completing my M.Ed. and its major component: the master’s paper.  Play through Literary Transcendence (my title, which basically means, how children play with books) looks at three unconventional titles for young children to discern how these books invite playful opportunities through the reading experience.  I will speak more on my research in a future post, but something really cool happened at home that directly correlated with my non-stop train of thought on this topic.

One of the books I explore in my paper is Eric Carle’s famous The Very Hungry Caterpillar.  In my paper, I assert that the cut-outs in the book not only facilitate engagement with the story of the caterpillar’s journey, but also contribute to opportunities for play for the young reader.

My Bucca has been thumbing through this book lately, and her 18-month-old brain has been soaking in the concept of caterpillar-into-butterfly.  While she was looking through the book, without my direct oversight, I noticed her carefully touching each cut-out hole on the famous spread of the caterpillar eating through an entire picnic spread.  As I saw her point to each hole, I started counting each time she moved her finger: 1…2…3…4…

Playing with The Very Hungry Caterpillar

As I counted and she touched, we created a new game within the book (making her repeat “AGAIN!” after she reached the end of the spread).  She was able to touch and count and play for several minutes before she brought me the book to re-read to her.  But her play really helped to solidify the ideas that I have been researching for months.  There are so many ways to play with books!

Happy Reading!

Lindsay

Holiday Books to Correspond with Experience

Hello, again!  I’m finally on break, with only one semester of classes left before I graduate with my M.Ed. in Children’s Literature.  School got real last semester and became even more demanding, explaining my blogging absence.  I know you were waiting breathlessly for my return (she said with complete and total sarcasm).  Well, I’m hoping that this break will allow for more reading and writing to share!

I’ve posted before about how children benefit greatly from books that reflect their current experiences.  Well, since this is my Bucca’s first REAL Christmas season (she was only six weeks old last Christmas), I want to expose her to books that showcase the images of the season, including the recent snow that fell in our area.

Cover of "Dream Snow"

Cover of Dream Snow

One of the first books I grabbed was Eric Carle’s Dream Snow.  I love unconventional and uniquely formatted picture books (in fact, my Master’s thesis will focus on these types of books), so the transparent overlays add interest and dimension to the story and the illustrations.  I also love how the farmer is a representation of Santa and not Santa himself.  In my mind, this allows the reader to adopt the notion that the spirit of St. Nicholas resides in all that love enough to give.

This book always makes me want to curl up with a blanket, a cup of peppermint tea and a good book.  In fact, this is my plan after Stella goes to sleep tonight.

As we read more Christmas and seasonal books, I’ll post our thoughts and favorites.  In the meantime, what are your go-to holiday books?

Happy Reading!

Lindsay and Bucca

Companion Books

I accidentally did something interesting at my last trip to the library.  While browsing the children’s books, I selected one book each from Eric Carle and Margaret Wise Brown.  Honey for a Child’s Heart advocates books by both of these authors for children under the age of one, and I wanted to expand my Bucca’s (and my own) awareness of these authors.  The books I chose were The Artist Who Painted a Blue Horse by Eric Carle and My World by Margaret Wise Brown.  Without immediately realizing it, I chose companions to books that are already on our shelves: Carle’s Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? and Brown’s Goodnight Moon are the partner books.

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Stella and I read each author’s books back-to-back.  She was especially interested in Carle’s books as we compared the blue horses in each story.  She was also very intrigued by the large and colorful illustrations of the other animals in The Artist.  This was actually the first book she pointed towards as it was sitting on our coffee table.  Needless to say…this is quite a special book for us now!

IMG_0519  IMG_0520

What companion stories have you found in literature for young children?  I’d love to hear your favorites and suggestions!

Happy Reading!

Lindsay (and Bucca)

Honey for a Child’s Heart, Beginnings

Cover of "Honey for a Child's Heart"

Cover of Honey for a Child’s Heart

Some dear friends gave my husband and I a copy of Honey for a Child’s Heart for our co-ed baby shower when we were expecting our Bucca.  This book by Gladys Hunt offers helpful advice on how parents can encourage reading and, more importantly, cultivate rich experiences for children through books.  As someone interested in experiential children’s literature, this book was a welcome addition to our library.

The title of the book implies the basics that parents offer to their children: milk represents a child’s physical needs and honey represents the richness of life.  While many parents are primarily concerned with providing the milk, the honey is just as important.  Hunt states:

To give honey, one must love honey and have it to give.  Good books are rich in honey, and hence the title of this book. (25)

While the first part of the book is interested in providing guidance to parents on how to create growth through books, the second part contains reading lists based on a child’s age.  While I’m not one to segment books to children based on only their age (I believe that books – and toys for that matter – should be chosen based on the uniqueness and individual nature of the child), I am thankful for Hunt’s suggestions.  The first book list is for children ages 0-3, and I hope to expose Bucca to all of the books in her first three years through frequent visits to the library.  I thought I had curated quite a beginning book collection for Stella, but to my surprise, we only have three books recommended on Hunt’s 0-3 list:

  • Good Night Moon by Margaret Wise Brown
  • The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle
  • Guess How Much I Love You by Sam McBratney

I’m excited to take Bucca through this list and record her reactions and responses to the books recommended in Honey for a Child’s Heart.  Hey…I’ll take any opportunity to read more books to her!  More to come!

Happy Reading!

Lindsay (and Bucca)