Tag Archives: Literacy

The Right Foundation for Loving Books

I’m so glad that Stella loves books.  I mean, she LOVES books.  Even if she’s surrounded by her train set, blocks, singing tea pot (yes…she has a singing tea pot) and puzzles, she will still reach for the stack on her bookshelf.

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I don’t only contribute this to my academic and professional interest in children’s books, but more so to those around me that have fostered a book-friendly environment since before Stella was born.

One of my best friends threw me a book-themed baby shower a month before my Bucca was born.  Each guest was tasked with bringing their favorite children’s book to build the baby’s library in lieu of a card.  The guests also attached bookplates to their choices with a little message to the baby.  I still love reading the bookplates as Stella chooses a book each day.

Book Shower

I know that book showers are no longer a new or original concept…just look at Pinterest.  But I can’t overstate the significance that this shower had on Stella’s love of books.  She was gifted books that I probably never would have exposed her to otherwise and some of those are her all-time favorites.

Stella has also been the recipient of some unique book-related gifts.  For her first birthday, some great friends got my Bucca a subscription to Babybug Magazine for a year.  These little magazines are more like board books.  Each issue contains songs, stories, poems and colorful illustrations.  Stella loves getting a new issue in the mail and goes back to previous issues again and again.  This was certainly one of the most meaningful and lasting first birthday gifts she received.  Click here for subscription information.

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The Imagination Library program has also proven to be invaluable to Stella’s growing library.  This program, initiated by Dolly Parton, provides children birth-age 5 with age-appropriate and free books each month in the mail.  I’m thankful that my mom has connected Stella with these books, which she is always excited to receive.  This program is not available in all areas, but those interested are able to replicate the program in their own community.  Check out the website to see if your community has an Imagination Library program in place AND, if not,  get information to start one.

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All of these things have been used in Stella’s life to establish a strong foundation with books and have allowed us to focus on literature as a significant component of our daily and collective family life.  I’m so thankful that those around me have contributed to building this structure.  As Gladys Hunt states in Honey for a Child’s Heart, “Don’t let your children live in spiritual poverty when abundance is available!  Fill your children up with words, with imaginative worlds, with adventures beyond your ken” (27).

Happy Reading!

Lindsay (and Bucca)

Developing Communication, Contentment and Belonging Through Signing

English: wiktionary:thank you diagrammatically...

 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I’ve recently been asked by a few people about my thoughts on sign language for babies.  Before I became a mom, I’ll admit that I completely dismissed the entire concept.  I was concerned that teaching a child to sign would ultimately create a delay in language skills.  However, as I’ve learned from many parents, educators, books and through personal experience, sign language for babies actually assists in developing a child’s overall communication and acts as a gateway to verbal skills and literacy.  Although this is a blog dedicated to children’s literature, I’m also interested in learning strategies that allow children to communicate and express themselves.  Words are powerful, not just on a page, but in all aspects of a child’s life!

As a new mom, I’m just navigating the waters of baby sign language.  My Bucca is a pro at signing “please” but currently has no interest in learning to sign “thank you.”  She pretty much just stares at me and my husband like we’re crazy, but we are still consistent in showing her the new sign and taking her hand to help her do it as well.  She’ll get there sooner or later!

Because my experience is limited, I’ve enlisted the help of some great ladies who have successfully implemented signing with their own children.  This post features the experience of Kristi, a mom of three great boys and a busy sales VP for a nutritional supplement company.  Here are her thoughts on how signing helped her boys communicate and find contentment:

My husband and I used sign language in our home with all three of our sons beginning at 6 months of age. I can’t say enough about the benefits of sign language with babies.  We found that signing eliminated frustration, tantrums and negative emotion because our children could communicate their needs and wants with us.  All three of our boys were early communicators with large vocabularies.  Signing only enhanced their verbal communication skills.  In terms of implementation…I say, keep it simple.  Find a resource that you can quickly read and implement.  We liked, “ Sign With Your Baby” by Joseph Garcia.  It is a quick read that will help you understand the concept and benefits with a nice reference guide in the back of the book.  We kept the book handy so that we could reference it if we couldn’t remember a particular sign.  We also showed the pictures to our children.  We would try to sign as much as we could when communicating with our kids.  Even if it takes them awhile to start signing themselves, keep signing to them.  Before you know it, when they are hungry they will sign “eat”.  Don’t be afraid to modify the signs, just make sure you keep it consistent.  We found that the signing became a bridge to verbal communication…from signing alone, to signing and speaking simultaneously, to verbal communication alone.  In our experience, signing with our babies helped them develop excellent communication skills and increased their feelings of happiness, contentment and belonging.  

Click here to learn more about Garcia’s book and other signing resources.

Happy Reading (and Signing)!

Lindsay