Tag Archives: Literature

Recent Favorites

Stella-Bucca is now 18 months old and has developed some definite favorites in terms of books, even desiring to “read” some to me as she flips through the pages and recites the lines she remembers from our reading experiences.  Here’s a quick rundown of some of Bucca’s recent favorites.  I’ve found that all of these have really captured her attention and delighted her to the point of desired multiple readings in one sitting.  All except Carle’s book feature a set rhythm that provides a sense of order in the text, which may be a contributing factor in my Bucca’s interest…she LOVES music and dancing, and many of these books can be sung as they’re read.

Our list includes:

We’re Going on a Bear Hunt by Helen Oxenbury and Michael Rosen

bear hunt

Hand, Hand, Fingers, Thumb by Al Perkins

hand hand

Moo, Baa, La La La by Sandra Boynton

moo baa

The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle

caterpillar

The Pout Pout Fish by Deborah Diesen

pout pout

Be sure to check them out!

Lindsay (and Bucca)

Guest Commentary: A Reluctant Reader’s Quest to Expose her Sons to Rich Reading Experiences

My lovely friend, Teresa, recently shared with me her personal experiences with growing up as a reluctant reader, but desiring for her sons to have rich and meaningful experiences with books.  Here, she discusses how she overcame her own resistance to books and developed daily practices with her family to promote sign language, literacy and a love of learning through books!alphabet_mags_12in(1)

When I think back to reading while growing up, I am plagued by the agonizing memory of headaches–I hated it. I always said that I hate reading, that I’m not a reader. Through high school I never read the textbooks and it showed on my report card. Even in college, I never read my Occupational Therapy books–how I got straight A’s in the program was only my validation that I was on the right career path because it came so naturally. I later learned that I am a kinesthetic learner: because of the way I took notes in college, when it came to test day I could “see” right where I had written the answer in my notebook.

When my husband and I were expecting our first child, Eli, I consistently read the “What to Expect When You’re Expecting” book, the holy grail of pregnancy! Soon after having him, I knew I needed to read more books to figure this parenting thing out. I found myself reading everything that came my way about breastfeeding, sign language, child development, raising a child by God’s grace…the list goes on and on! But within that process, something clicked.  I realized I do love to read!

When I thought back to my childhood, and even talked to my mom, we never had shelves of books in our house. I never remember sitting around reading a book, or seeing her read. I knew at that time that I wanted my boy to enjoy reading and do well in school and THIS was the key component I had missed when growing up.

At 3 months of age, I started taking Eli to a reading program at our then local library in Colorado Springs. It was a 30 minute class with other new moms. It started with a little song/finger play, then they’d read a book and had the same one to pass out to each child for them to explore.  We would learn a “sign” that related to the story like “more”, “milk” ,”bear” and so forth. At the end, the babies would get to play with some toys, we’d sing one last song at that was it. We did this program for about 9 months and by this time I was pregnant with #2 and was just too tired, so we took a few months off! On top of the reading program, I would check out a few books and read them with him each day and did quite a bit of sign language using the book, “Baby Signing 1 2 3: The Easy-to-Use Illustrated Guide for Every Stage and Every Age” by Nancy Cadjan. I made flash cards of all the signs, laminated them and put them on key chains in various places around the house so we could keep introducing new signs to him.

Around 12 months we started spelling out his name with foam letters in the bathtub. Somewhere around 18 months we realized he was saying the letters E and H…he would laugh hysterically when we say them, and we realized that he really “knew” them consistently. So, I started really working on all the letters with him. By 2 years he knew all of his letters and their letter sound. By 3 he knew simple site words and now at around 3.5 he can read simple books. As far as Ian goes, our second son, he’s a sharp little guy too! He is 2.5 and also knows all his letters and about 20 letter sounds, can spell his name, can count to 14, knows about 8 shapes and 8 of the basic colors.  We also read a book to them every night and go to the library about every week. Our community has an awesome library…the boys start by going in and coloring, then they sing songs, read a book, learn a new “sign” and finish up with 3-4 stations of sensory play/fine motor activities.

I feel like all of these literacy experiences (signing, letter recognition, family reading and library time) has made reading more enjoyable for the boys.  Daily, Ian can be found laying on the floor surrounded by books or curled up on the couch with one. And during “nap” time in the afternoon, Eli has books sprawled across his bedroom floor and I can hear him reading them aloud. He often acts out the stories he’s read with toys around the house…it’s really neat to see!  I’m glad they get so much enjoyment out of reading (especially since I didn’t while growing up) and I do believe it will help them to be a lifelong learners!

Our Favorite Sleepy Books

In a recent post on my other blog, Mrs. B & Mrs. V, I list some of Stella’s favorite nap and bedtime reads thus far.  Be sure to check it out if you’re looking for something new to read during sleepy times!  Click here to read!

 

Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell? Not in Children’s Literature! (An Overview of the TELL ME Framework)

Teachers and parents strive everyday to prompt conversations among children about books.  Sometimes starting these conversations can be like pulling teeth.  Aidan Chambers realized this and sought to create a framework for adults to engage children in reading thoughtfully and responding articulately to the books they’ve read.  In his book, Tell Me: Children, Reading, and Talk, Chambers outlines steps for adults to take in sparking conversations that make children excited, not just about reading, but about talking about reading.

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Chambers places equal value on reading books and talking about books.  He states:

“Talking well about books is a high-value activity in itself.  But talking well about books is also the best rehearsal there is for talking well about other things.  So in helping children to talk about their reading, we help them to be articulate about the rest of their lives” (2).

I love that Chambers sees the act of reading in this constructive manner.  Reading not only has intrinsic value in itself, but the activity can be used as a tool to enhance individualism and overall personal development.  But, in order for books to have this transformative impact, the adults in a child’s life must place value on reading and engaging children in a dialogue about literature.  Chambers is clear that children cannot become avid readers if they are not within an environment that supports and encourages this activity.  Adults need to be available to help a child make sense of the marks on each page of a chosen book.  There is a direct correlation between the richness of a child’s reading environment and the richness of the talk surrounding the books they have read.

But how do adults create such a positive environment?  It starts with two words: TELL ME.  Adults can prompt meaningful conversations simply by uttering these unassuming words.  Chambers advocates that adults ask children to tell them about the following aspects of a book:

  • Tell me what you liked
  • Tell me what you didn’t like
  • Tell me what puzzled you
  • Tell me about patterns you noticed

These simple requests will do so much more than asking a child the most common question: Why?   The  Why? question can often be too big for a child to process.  Chambers states that Why? can overwhelm a child because he assumes that the adult already knows the answer and is expecting something specific.  Contrastingly, Tell me… frees a child from assumed expectations and allows him to generously articulate true responses.

Try using this approach while reading to your children, and see if more thoughtful and excited responses emerge in your book-talk.  More posts on the specifics of the “Tell Me” approach will be coming soon!

Happy Reading!

Lindsay

Why Children’s Literature?

So, you may be wondering why I began graduate study in children’s literature and decided to dedicate an entire blog to it.  Back when I began my studies, I couldn’t really put my finger on what it was that drew me into the study of books for children.  At the time I was working at an early childhood development center and was the proud aunt of a toddler boy.  (I still am a proud aunt, although my nephew is certainly not a toddler anymore!)  Being around young children at this time and hearing their interactions each day inspired me to try my hand at writing stories for kids.  I then enrolled in a non-credit writing course.  This not only enhanced my interest in writing, but it really ignited my passion for children’s literature.  I re-visited so many stories I loved growing up and was introduced to more modern, complex, and fascinating tales and characters.  Soon my bookshelves were bursting with more and more children’s books…and I didn’t even have a child of my own!

At the suggestion of a writing advisor, I decided to apply for a program to receive my Master’s degree in children’s literature.  After an entrance exam and a lengthy application process I was accepted and began what would become one of the most meaningful experiences of my life.  I became drawn to picture books as a writer and reader, so the first text of the first course I took in the program eloquently put into words my feelings about becoming deeply involved in children’s literature.  In their book , The Picture Book Comes of Age, Joseph and Chava Schwarcz state that picture book components work together to impact a reader through, “…their playfulness – visual communication, optical illusions, and message in configurations of shapes and colors surround us, beckon to us, and often practically enwrap us” (3).

This is what I love about children’s literature: the experiential nature that invites readers to laugh out loud, stare at a lovely image, communicate their feelings, or just play.  I have learned to appreciate children’s literature for this potential and I hope that your experience of children’s books will change or become enhanced through this blog.

Happy Reading!

Lindsay